10 Greatest Movie Villains of All-Time (Clayton Davis)

8
top1011 *Our yearly tradition that cites the “Greatest ___ of All-Time” begins once again with a look at the baddest guys and gals of the silver screen.  Each writer will deliver their own set of ten, likely with all different interpretations of “the villain” and what they mean.  If you miss one, click on the tag “10 Greatest Villains of All-Time“*

Our yearly greatest series is at its end.  All current writers of AwardsCircuit.com have made their cases for their favorite villains and I end it with my own personal list.  There have been different interpretations of the assignment.  Some will say that the character solely is what makes him/her/it so despicable.  Others will argue the validity of someone being classified as a villain.  I’m still unsure where I stand on people like Anthony Perkins in “Psycho” or Anthony Hopkins in “The Silence of the Lambs.”  All have their evil ways, but I don’t see them as a straight, up and down, “bad guy.” My interpretation is a bit more simple.  How good does the actor or actress make it look to be bad?  Some of these men and women are downright horrible, many of which I can remember just sitting in disgust by their behavior.  For me, that’s what its all about.  The undisputable actions of the character and what they bring to their respective pictures.  Anyone can do a bad thing but are they evil at the core of their soul?  That’s the question I ask for every single person on the ten and the answer is yes for them.

Before we begin, here are some shout outs to the ones that just missed the cut:
  • Ralph Fiennes as “Amon Goeth” in “Schindler’s List” – Not just a villain to the Jews, but to his own inner demons.
  • Anjelica Huston as “The Grand High Witch” in “Witches” – She wants all the children in the world turned into a mouse.
  • Christopher Lloyd as “Judge Doom” in “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” – He killed Eddie Valiant’s brother, framed Roger Rabbit, and shoved a poor toy shoe in a barrel of dip.
  • Daniel Day-Lewis as “Bill the Butcher” in “Gangs of New York” – Even when DiCaprio kills him, we still kind of wish he wasn’t dead.
  • Tony Moran as “Michael Myers” in “Halloween” – Since 1978, the world has continued to fear a man who barely walks after his victims with a white mask.
  • Hugo Weaving as “Agent Smith” in “The Matrix” – His sinister and venomous way he says “Mr. Anderson” is a staple of film history.
  • Ned Beatty as “Lotso” in “Toy Story 3” – He almost allows all his fellow toys burn to death in an incinerator before he’s tacked onto the front of a truck.
  • Kiefer Sutherland as “David” in “The Lost Boys” – He leads human Michael to a cliff that nearly has him fall off.  He also just sheds a single tear when his hand is caught in the sunlight.
  • Macaulay Culkin as “Henry” in “The Good Son” – He kills his little brother in a bathtub, throws his sister onto a thin sheet of ice, flings a makeshift dummy onto a speeding highway, and shoots a dog with steel bolts.  Oh yeah, and attempts to push his mother off a cliff.
  • Sarah Michelle Gellar as “Kathryn Merteuil” in “Cruel Intentions” – She keeps cocaine in a crucifix.  That’s gangster.
  • Adam Baldwin as “The King” in “Radio Flyer” – You never see his face and you don’t need to.  He leads a young boy to hurdle down a hill, in a wagon, and escape his clutches in an ending that has different interpretations, all of which are tragic in their own right.

10) Raymond Burr as “Lars Thorwald” in “Rear Window” (1954) Lars_Thorwald

He’s watched by L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies in the dark of night, hiding the truth about what he did to his wife.  When he discovers that someone might know his truth, through a flash bulbs used in a way that only Alfred Hitchcock can think of, a small glare on his glasses and a manic, furious stature attempts to take a wheelchair-ridden man and hang him from his own window.  He’s not scary in the things we see him do, but in the things we imagine him doing.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Killing wives and neighbors dogs digging in the dirt.

9) Nicolas Cage and John Travolta as “Castor Troy” – “Face/Off” (1997)

With gold guns, a swagger that only mobsters can dream, and his ability to still have some type of demented love for his younger brother Pollux (played by Alessandro Nivola), Castor Troy is one of the coolest, underappreciated villains in film history. After he accidentally murders Sean Archer’s young son, he delivers a nonchalant apology saying “I was trying to kill you but you had to take it so personal.” When the two arch enemies switch lives, the diabolical Castor Troy gets to sleep with Sean’s wife, murder his mentor, and attempt to slice his own face off in the event of defeat. The guy is just bad ass.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Saying to flight attendants, “If I let you lick my tongue, would you be grateful?”

8) Louise Fletcher as “Nurse Ratchet” in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) Nurse-Ratched-Unsung-Films-1
She’s often looked upon as someone who is just doing her job, very much in the beginning of Milos Forman’s Oscar-winning masterpiece, but all takes a stirring turn. As Mac’s (played by Jack Nicholson) time in the mental institution goes on, there’s a sick sense of pleasure and pride that oozes from Academy Award winner Louise Fletcher’s skin. She works the system and takes her time in ruining the lives of so many patients, including our beloved Billy Bibbit (played by Academy Award nominee Brad Dourif), who meets his end because of her actions.  She’s probably one of cinema’s most unconventional villains because the audience clearly doesn’t like her and she is the opposition to Mac’s plans.  In regards to my aforementioned question in the opening paragraph, I’m not sure Nurse Ratchet was TRULY evil until she met Mac just as I think that Mac wasn’t TRULY good until he met her.

WHAT DRIVES HER: Eyes that only the Grimm Reaper himself would have and being choked out by angry patients.

7) Joaquin Phoenix as “Commodus” in “Gladiator” (2000) movies-gladiator

The magnificent Joaquin Phoenix has delivered pulse-pounding performances in films like “The Master” and “Walk the Line,” but his work as the royally obsessed Commodus in Ridley Scott’s Best Picture winner is among his most impressive. He suffocates his father Marcus Aurelius (played by the late Richard Harris) after he reveals that Commodus will not take the throne. After which, he sends soldiers to murder the wife and child of Maximus (played by Russell Crowe). But Commodus’ wrath doesn’t stop there. He makes sexual advances to his sister Lucilla (played by Connie Nielsen), and makes her attempt to make her son every ounce of his own being. He’s so envious of Maximus, he challenges the trained Gladiator to a duel, but not before poisoning him to ensure victory. Things don’t go as planned.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Constantly sniffling and being an all-around pansy.

6) Jack Nicholson as “Colonel Nathan R. Jessup, USMC” in “A Few Good Men” (1992) jacknicholson_fewgoodmen

Plain and simple, he ordered the code red, and he’s damn proud of it. At the expense of his soul, and the lives and careers of younger Marines, Colonel Nathan R. Jessup takes the stand, after forgering log books, ordering Kendrick (played by Kiefer Sutherland) to give Private Santiago a code red, which leads his untimely death, and knowing fully well that his right hand Lieutenant has killed himself over the guilt, and justifies his actions with a simple, “you can’t handle the truth!” But not before he answers the question about the code red with “you’re damn right I did.” The defense rests.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Ripping the eyes out of Tom Cruise’s skull.

5) Bob Gunton as “Warden Samuel Norton” in “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994) bobgunton_shawshank_redemption

The Warden is a Holy man. He gives the Bible and discipline to all his inmates. That doesn’t stop him from using the innocent Andy (played by Tim Robbins) to do money laundering inside of Shawshank, shine his shoes, and kill the just newly GED bestowed Tommy Williams (played by Gil Bellows). The cowardly villain attempts to go out swinging but when the thought of being an inmate in prison is too heavy a thought, he alleviates that with a bullet through his chin.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Money inside a pie box and passing the pie off to Andy saying “the woman can’t bake worth a shit.”

4) Ray Milland as “Tony Wendice” in “Dial M for Murder” (1954) raymilland_dial-m-for-murder-4

Tony Wendice comes up with the best plan I’ve seen from a fictional character trying to kill his wife. He finds an acquaintance from Cambridge with his own secrets to safeguard, C.A. Swann (played by Anthony Dawson), and manipulates him to carrying out his dirty work but not before he takes it in the back with a pair of scissors.  With a beautiful wife (played by Grace Kelly), Wendice tries to cover up his tracks with latch keys and reasons for telephone calls.  The audience is left in the dark of what people know and don’t know until it all comes to ahead with a memory of a key under a mat.  And just to think, this all started with a wife’s misdeeds with a lover.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Calling his wife and hearing her getting choked out by another man.

3) Lee J Cobb as “Johnny Friendly” in  “On the Waterfront” (1954) onthewaterfront

Johnny Friendly’s mob ties, and power over the waterfront are just the tip of iceberg.  He has Terry Malloy’s (played by Marlon Brando) brother Charley (played by Rod Steiger) killed, and when Terry stands up to him one on one, and is winning, he punks out by calling his thugs.  Even at the end when he announces that he will seek revenge, and his voice falls on deaf ears as the factory doors close, we’re left with a sense that Johnny Friendly will get his revenge.  That’s scary.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Big suits and the pursuit of revenge.

2) Tim Curry as “Pennywise the Dancing Clown” in “Stephen King’s It” (1990) tim-curry-It

Tim Curry haunted my nightmares for the better part of my childhood because Pennywise.  Though this made-for-TV mini-series is half masterpiece and half sickening adult melodrama, “It” exists in the world because of the terrifying performance that Tim Curry delivers.  Though writer/director Tommy Lee Wallace was limited in what he could show (as the film debuted in November on ABC, right before Thanksgiving), he allows the actions of Pennywise to scare us with words.  We know that Pennywise rips poor George’s arm off in a sewer as he plays with a boat, the adult Stan kills himself at the thought of Pennywise returning, and he makes balloon popping a national crime.

WHAT DRIVES HIM: Telling the kids how “they float, they all float.”

1) Rebecca DeMornay as “Peyton Flanders” in “The Hand that Rocks the Cradle” (1992)

It’s one of the most overlooked performances in history as far as I’m concerned.  She’s deadly, she’s hot, and she will fold your laundry as she thinks of her next way to ruin your life.  Peyton, as we’re not even sure if that’s her real name by film’s end, is the wife of a doctor that is accused of sexually assaulting his patients.  When he kills himself, the pregnant “Mrs. Mott” miscarriages, gets an emergency hysterectomy, and declares war on Claire (played by Annabella Sciorra), the woman who came first with the doctor’s indiscretions.  Peyton infuses her way into Claire’s life by befriending her daughter Emma (played by Madeline Zima) by twisting her school bully’s arm and telling him she’s going to “rip your fucking head off.”  She makes not-so-subtle sexual advances to her scientist husband Michael (played by Matt McCoy) through sexy nightgowns, wet clothes, and innuendos.  She also manages to abuse the sweet Solomon (played by Ernie Hudson), the mentally disabled worker just trying to build a fence.  She makes out to be a child molester when she’s done with him.  But it’s the sassy Marlene Craven (played by Oscar-winner Julianne Moore) that gets the shitty end of the stick as she runs into a greenhouse to tell Claire about Peyton’s real past and takes in the back from falling glass and debris.  But where Peyton really shines in her villainous ways is by breastfeeding Claire’s newborn baby Joey in the dark of night.  You can shoot, kill, or torture a person, but taking the maternal place of a woman might be one of the lowest.  It’s a work that not many people think of but all people should seek if you haven’t seen it.

WHAT DRIVES HER: See through nightgowns and the sexiest person to ever cut an apple and eat it while she watches someone die.

Time to include your own in the comments below.

 

SHARE
Previous articleLAFF Film Review: The Girl in the Book (★★★½)
Next articleLAFF Review: Sin Alas (★★)
Clayton Davis is the esteemed Editor and Owner of AwardsCircuit.com. Born in Bronx, NY to a Puerto Rican mother and Black father, he’s been criticizing film and television for over a decade. Clayton is a member of the Broadcast Film Critics Association where he votes and attends the kick off to the awards season, the Critics Choice Awards. He’s also an active member of New York Film Critics Online, International Press Academy, Black Reel Awards, and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association. Clayton has been quoted and appeared in various outlets that include The New York Times, CNN.com, Variety, Deadline, Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg Television, AOL, Huffington Post, Bloomberg Radio, The Wrap, Slash Film, and the Hollywood Reporter.
  • Kristen Lopez

    YES, YES, YES on Rebecca DeMornay! I just recorded a podcast about this movie and my adoration of it and, dare I say, its feminist aspects! Clayton Davis, you are AWESOME!

  • Ryan

    As it turns out, after narrowing my list down, I ended up with eleven picks that I just couldn’t say no to. So I ended up eliminating the one who wasn’t entirely evil despite his actions. With that said, an honorable mention to Claude Raine’s Senator Paine from Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. His villainous deeds are perhaps more cringeworthy than those of anybody else on this list, but when I consider the character’s ultimate redemption by film’s end as well as his generally earnest intentions, it becomes hard to keep him on the list.

    10. Mr. Potter – It’s a Wonderful Life
    Most villains usually end up with their plans foiled by the hero long before the audience gets a chance to see what they had in store. In Mr. Potter’s case, we are told for most of the movie that without George Bailey to stand in his way, Mr. Potter would crush Bedford Falls and everyone in it in favor of his sleazy casino empire. This is a tough image to grasp, but the film’s final act allows us to actually see the influence of Potter’s corruption spread throughout the usually friendly Bedford Falls (egh…. Pottertown.) For a film that lets the audience feel welcome in Bedford Falls as if it were our own home, we have to watch in horror as Mr. Potter tears it down right in front of us. Villains don’t often feel as personal Mr. Potter.

    9. Blackout – Transformers
    Okay, so this one probably needs some sort of explanation. Not only is this a generally disliked film, but Blackout isn’t even the main villain in the movie, with practically no say in the Deceptions’ evil plans. So why is he on the list? Because he is a genuinely terrifying spectacle to behold. The opening scene is tense and mysterious even though we already know that the helicopter is actually a giant robot. But the eerie vibe never breaks even after Blackout starts tearing apart the military base as he demonstrates exactly what it means to be out-gunned. This scene alone shouldn’t be enough to justify a place on this list, however, nothing has made my heart sink quite as fast as the image of a robot perching himself on a skyscraper, as one of the surviving soldiers, in typical Michael Bay fashion, laments, “We are so dead.”

    8. Lisa – Girl, Interrupted
    In movie villains, we often see them carry out their agenda without any sort of remorse for anything that they do. It is what we expect. If a villain issues an order to kill innocent people, they don’t feel awful about it. They have made up their minds about what they are willing to do. Such is not the case for Angelina Jolie’s Lisa, who doesn’t feel awful about anything. She does what she wants, and whatever happens afterwards is somebody else’s problem. She knows she hurts people, but keeps up the image that she is always looking out for everyone. And for a while, it appears that we can trust her intentions. But in a key scene, even when her consequences take her off guard and we expect remorse of some kind for what she has done, she instantly becomes hostile and full of hate. Because, “She’s the villain, baby.”

    7. Darth Vader – The Empire Strikes Back
    There is a lot that has been said about Darth Vader for decades, but an angle that I rarely see brought up is just how much of a total psychopath he is. In Episode IV, we get to see Vader as a villain of great power and someone to hate for betraying the Jedi, but there isn’t a ton of character to go behind the mask until Episode V. As the opening crawl informs us, Vader has developed an obsession with hunting Luke to bring him to the dark side. Along the way, he murders his commanding officers if they hit a rough patch, and sacrifices whole star destroyers holding hundreds of people by throwing them out into asteroid fields without reason. He holds entire cities under hostage at a moment’s notice, and isn’t above torture, bounty hunters, or falling back on his deals. But what makes him truly psycho, is his fit of rage as he is fighting Luke. Having been denied his easy prey, it becomes apparent that Vader has lost all control as he throws himself into his strikes and his signature breathing becomes faster and faster. He is out for blood and it is our ability to sense his anger that makes him such a memorable villain.

    6. John Doe – Se7en
    It would be too obvious to say that it is often refreshing when a villain ends up overcoming the hero instead of the other way around. These ‘masterminds’ are able to predict every move the hero makes, and as a result, remain one step ahead of them. Kevin Spacey’s John Doe accomplishes this, and then some. This is a man who is willing to allow himself to be destroyed in the name of fulfilling his gruesome agenda. For a time, the audience remains confused as to why he reveals himself when he does, but by the film’s finale, John Doe does the unthinkable: He is ready to accept the consequences of his own sins. Few villains are willing to examine their own madness as closely as John Doe does, and amid all of the gruesome murders and psychological torture, he stands out as a villain because he never makes a wrong move. No matter what, he wins, and he makes sure you know that. That’s pretty twisted.

    5. Mal – Inception
    There is something to be said about a woman who will do anything to help her husband get back to his kids. Marion Cotillard’s Mal becomes desperate when she finds out that her husband, Dom, has confused the imaginary world for the real one, and is running out of options to bring him to kill himself in the dream, so that he may return to his kids. The problem? Mal is actually the one who is confused. Though she is in reality, she thinks she is still dreaming, and is still looking for ways to get Dom to kill himself. This might reveal good intentions, though her plan to checkmate Dom into killing himself is the stuff that nightmares are made of. Later, her sympathetic tendencies give way to selfishness, as her jealousy evolves into flat out evil. Mal embodies intrigue and mystery so well that even when all of her cards are on the table, we know that there are still many things that we don’t understand about her.

    4. Commodus – Gladiator
    So, if you murder your father to become the most powerful man in the world, you clearly aren’t a pleasant person to be around. And naturally, if there is one man who has the power to call you out on that murder, you kill him. But you start to cross the line when you decide that the innocent family of that man needs to be burnt at the stake as well. Commodus is so memorably vile and arrogant that he would go even further by walking right up to the grieving father’s face, and rub salt in the wound. He is a coward, a traitor, and a menace. Joaquin Phoenix gives an absolutely chilling performance, and the “Am I Not Merciful!” scene is the stuff that legends are made of. There isn’t a character on this list that I hate more than him.

    3. The Joker – The Dark Knight
    You know why.

    2. Eve Harrington – All About Eve
    What makes Eve’s character so frightening is just how inconsequential she appears to be to everyone else’s lives. To every Broadway bigwig that she touches elbows with, she is just a desperate actress in need of a little help on her way up. She is grateful, and charming, and naive, and generous. That is, right up until she isn’t. It’s amazing to see that for someone who has depended so heavily on other people’s mercy for her entire career, that she is unable to show any mercy at all to those who helped her become successful in the first place. She accepts people’s trust as if it were currency, only to spend it when an opportunity presents itself. Eve is a saboteur, a blackmailer, and a straight up liar. She is a wolf among lambs.

    1. Christine Vole – Witness for the Prosecution
    There is an argument to be made that Christine is in fact, not the villain, but the victim. There have also been a few femme fatales on this list, but none that immediately present themselves as treacherous from the start. Unpredictability is the name of her game. Nothing she says in confidence is ever the same when she is on the witness stand. Even when it is revealed that her purpose used and betrayed her, this does not make Christine any less of an evil genius. Sure, Christine doesn’t shove pencils into people’s eye sockets, or force people to eat themselves to death, or blow up planets, but what she pulls off instead is so clever it’s scary. She has everything under control, even when you think she isn’t. She knows what will happen next, even if you are the lawyer running the show. But even when she ends up being made a complete fool of, she still manages to have one last trick up her sleeve.

  • Kevin

    Very good list. One of your picks makes my personal 10 as well.
    10. Vincent: Collateral
    9. John Doe: Se7en
    8. Dolores Umbridge: Harry Potter 5
    7. Hans Landa: Inglorious Bastards
    6. Rene Belloq: Indiana Jones
    5. Warden Norton: The Shawshank Redemption
    4. Darth Vader: Star Wars
    3. Hans Gruber: Die Hard
    2. The Joker: The Dark Knight
    1. Amon Goeth: Schindler’s List

  • Sam Schaffer

    20. Kathy Bates as Annie Wilkes in Misery
    19. Robert De Niro as Max Cady in Cape Fear
    18. Ralph Fiennes as Amon Goeth in Schindler’s List
    17. Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratchet in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    16. Joaquin Phoenix as Commodus in Gladiator
    15. Ian McDiarmid as Emperor Palpatine in Star Wars series
    14. Alice Krige as Borg Queen in Star Trek: First Contact
    13. Ricardo Montalban as Khan in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
    12. Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
    11. Robert Patrick as T-1000 in Terminator 2
    10. Tilda Swinton as White Witch in The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
    9. Jack Nicholson as The Jocker in Batman
    8. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman in Batman Returns
    7. Geoffrey Rush as Captain Hector Barbossa in Pirates of the Caribbean
    6. Anjelica Huston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches
    5. Margaret Hamilton as Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz
    4. Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs
    3. Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter series
    2. Heath Ledger as The Joker in The Dark Knight
    1. Darth Vader voiced by James Earl Jones in Star Wars trilogy

  • Sam Schaffer

    20. Kathy Bates as Annie Wilkes in Misery
    19. Robert De Niro as Max Cady in Cape Fear
    18. Christopher Lee as Saruman in The Lord of the Rings
    17. Ralph Fiennes as Amon Goeth in Schindler’s List
    16. Joaquin Phoenix as Commodus in Gladiator
    15. Ian McDiarmid as Emperor Palpatine in Star Wars series
    14. Alice Krige as Borg Queen in Star Trek: First Contact
    13. Ricardo Montalban as Khan in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
    12. Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
    11. Robert Patrick as T-1000 in Terminator 2
    10. Tilda Swinton as White Witch in The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
    9. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman in Batman Returns
    8. Geoffrey Rush as Captain Hector Barbossa in Pirates of the Caribbean
    7. Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratchet in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    6. Anjelica Huston as The Grand High Witch in The Witches
    5. Margaret Hamilton as Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz
    4. Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs
    3. Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter series
    2. Heath Ledger as The Joker in The Dark Knight / Jack Nicholson as The Jocker in Batman
    1. Darth Vader voiced by James Earl Jones in Star Wars trilogy

  • Sam Schaffer

    20. Kathy Bates as Annie Wilkes in Misery
    19. Robert De Niro as Max Cady in Cape Fear
    18. Christopher Lee as Saruman in The Lord of the Rings
    17. Ralph Fiennes as Amon Goeth in Schindler’s List …
    16. Joaquin Phoenix as Commodus in Gladiator
    15. Ian McDiarmid as Emperor Palpatine in Star Wars series
    14. Alice Krige as Borg Queen in Star Trek: First Contact
    13. Ricardo Montalban as Khan in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
    12. Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
    11. Robert Patrick as T-1000 in Terminator 2
    10. Tilda Swinton as White Witch in The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe
    9. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman in Batman Returns
    8. Geoffrey Rush as Captain Hector Barbossa in Pirates of the Caribbean
    7. Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratchet in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    6. Anjelica Huston as Grand High Witch in The Witches
    5. Margaret Hamilton as Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz
    4. Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs
    3. Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter series
    2. Heath Ledger / Jack Nicholson as The Joker in The Dark Knight / Batman
    1. Darth Vader voiced by James Earl Jones in Star Wars trilogy

  • Loody

    Really good list Clayton, though technically I would have banned Tim Curry in IT because it was Made-For-TV.

    I am still surprised nobody has listed either Javier Bardem in NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN or Anne Baxter as Eve Harrington in ALL ABOUT EVE both of whom are the epitome of a great villain in completely different ways. Oh well, too each their own.

  • Aldebaran

    Dear Clayton give Don Logan ( Ben Kingsley) a chance for his portrayal of a villain in ” Sexy Beast” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izuGqIi_-vc