Top 10: Movies That Opened in January

9. “Taken”

Released: January 30, 2009

The now infamous Liam Neeson action franchise all started with a small film the studio dumped in January. After people started catching on, the film grew to obscene proportions, spawning two sequels. While those came off as crass and redundant, the original is a high energy thriller that never fails to entertain. Bryan Mills (Neeson) is a bodyguard with a certain set of skills who springs into action once his daughter (Maggie Grace) is kidnapped during a Europe trip. Neeson’s intense, committed acting made this such an infamous project and an unlikely action hero. The film veers from one kinetic action sequence to the next with wild abandon. It’s thrilling, especially if you turn your brain off. The greatest strength of the film is it knows how to build, as each punch and explosion is bigger, better and more exciting than the last.

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About Christopher James

Christopher James has been an Oscar obsessive ever since watching his first ceremony at age 5 when "Titanic" won Best Picture. He is a recent graduate from Loyola Marymount University with degrees in Screenwriting for Film and Television and Marketing. Christopher currently works in media strategy and planning at Liquid Advertising, based out of Los Angeles, CA. You can find Christopher running on the sunny beach, brunching at trendy restaurants or mostly just sitting in a dark room watching movies and TV in sweatpants. Follow me on Twitter @cwj92movieman
  • Luke McGowan

    Taken was January? Wow

  • Rubén González

    The Silence of the Lambs was also released in January and won the Best Picture Oscar.

    • Reece

      february

      • Rubén González

        Sorry, I was confused. It was only released in New York City in Janaury, and then in the whole country in February. I guess that’s what the author means about “proper release”.

  • David Weidner

    Love City of God, but being a little older than most on the site, I can remember 1990. A one-two punch of John Dahl’s Kill Me Again, and Ron Underwood’s Tremors.