WATCH: Jane Goodall Expands Our Minds in Brett Morgen’s ‘JANE’ Trailer, Poster

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Gombe, Tanzania - Jane Goodall and infant chimpanzee Flint reach out to touch each other's hands. Flint was the first infant born at Gombe after Jane arrived. With him she had a great opportunity to study chimp development—and to have physical contact, which is no longer deemed appropriate with chimps in the wild. The feature documentary JANE will be released in select theaters October 2017. (National Geographic Creative/ Hugo van Lawick).

National Geographic is giving us a new look at one of the world’s most beloved academics. “JANE,” a documentary from director Brett Morgen (“Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck”), tells the story of Jane Goodall’s research and connection with chimpanzees alongside glimpses into her life with first husband Hugo van Lawick and their child, Hugo Jr. See the official poster below.

Official poster for “Jane.”

According to a press release, “”JANE” is the story of how Jane Goodall became Jane Goodall.” After watching the trailer, I heartily agree (and maybe wish I became an anthropologist instead of a writer). Scored by composer Philip Glass, Morgen uses over 100 hours of previously unseen footage from Goodall’s earliest trips to Tanzania’s Combe Stream National Park to study chimpanzees. Her work was groundbreaking during the 1960s, at a time when anthropologists knew next to nothing about primates in their natural environments. The footage, filmed by future husband Lawick, is intercut with interviews with modern day Goodall, in order to provide a vivid portrait of Goodall’s formative years in the academic world.

Morgen, who also wrote the documentary, is known for detailed and critically acclaimed work in the documentary genre. He’s been behind some of the biggest documentaries of the new millennium, including “Cobain: Montage of Heck,” “Chicago 10,” and “The Kid Stays in the Picture.” “JANE” is already gaining attention from film critics, snagging a nomination for the Grierson Award at the London Film Festival and a nomination for Zelda Penzel Giving Voice to the Voiceless Award at the Hamptons International Film Festival. “JANE” was also an official selection at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) and the 55th New York Film Festival (NYFF55).

“JANE” comes to select theaters Oct. 20. Watch the trailer below, and check out some stills from the film below.

Gombe, Tanzania – David Greybeard was the first chimp to lose his fear of Jane, eventually coming to her camp to steal bananas and allowing Jane to touch and groom him. As the film JANE depicts, Jane and the other Gombe researchers later discontinued feeding and touching the wild chimps. (National Geographic Creative/ Hugo van Lawick)
Gombe, Tanzania – Jane formed a close bond with young Fifi. As the film “Jane” depicts, Jane and the other Gombe researchers later discontinued feeding and touching the wild chimps. (National Geographic Creative/ Hugo van Lawick)
Gombe, Tanzania – “Flint” peeks into a tent at Jane Goodall. (National Geographic Creative / Hugo van Lawick)
Bournemouth, England – A young Jane Goodall poses for a picture in her school uniform. (Jane Goodall Institute)
Gombe, Tanzania – Hugo van Lawick poses with a smile. (Jane Goodall Institute)
Gombe, Tanzania – Jane Goodall watches as Hugo van Lawick operates a film camera. (Jane Goodall Institute)
Gombe, Tanzania – Jane Goodall kisses her son Grub. (Jane Goodall Institute/Hugo van Lawick)
Bournemouth, England – Jane Goodall and Hugo van Lawick during their wedding. (Jane Goodall Institute)
Gombe, Tanzania – Young Chimpanzee Flint. (Jane Goodall Institute)
Gombe, Tanzania – Two adult chimps, one young chimp. The feature documentary JANE will be released in select theaters October 2017. (Jane Goodall Institute)

Will you be watching “JANE”? How did you first learn about Jane Goodall’s work? Let us know in the comments below!