When “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” was canceled by Fox last year, the internet surprisingly exploded in sadness. While the show rarely performed well in the ratings, there was a small group of fans who wanted to keep the show alive. In many ways, you could tell the showrunners, including Dan Goor and Mike Schur, knew the end could be on the way. The way season 5 wrapped up, it actually would have been an excellent series finale. However, with the outcry and fan support, NBC decided to make a different choice. Rather than letting the show go, they resurrected it as part of their NBC lineup. In many ways, the homecoming (NBC produced the show despite it airing on Fox) made sense. After seeing the first few episodes of Season 6, all remains good in the Nine-Nine.

This season picks up immediately after Jake (Andy Samberg) and Amy (Melissa Fumero) have been married. Captain Raymond Holt (Andre Braugher) hears the results of the police commissioner job search. Meanwhile, the rest of the Nine-Nine, including Terry (Terry Crews), Rosa (Stephanie Beatriz), Charles (Joe Lo Truglio) and Gina (Chelsea Peretti) celebrate Jake and Amy. Without giving too much away, events kick into motion that will take up the next season. The first few episodes begin to peel back some layers on existing characters. At the same time, the hi-jinks the show has become known for continue throughout the series.

The show lives and dies on a few key characters, but Goor & Schur know how to utilize everyone to perfection. Samberg does Samberg stuff, and you’re a fan nothing really changes. For Braugher, the writers have absolutely keyed into how to make Holt one of the funniest characters on television. Braugher gives an Emmy worthy performance out the gate. Captain Holt remains one of the very best characters on television, and Braugher is simply amazing again.

At the same time, the show’s reemergence at NBC works as excellent counter-programming. Something about the new home has given the show a new vibrancy and willingness to engage in meta-comedy. An early episode works as an origin story for two beloved characters, and it works as both a humanizing and comedic story. Meanwhile, the barbs that poke at “Law & Order” and police procedurals have more teeth on NBC, the home of Dick Wolf. The characters continue to work on their own merits, as is tradition with Schur produced shows. Yet the extra humor at NBC’s expense makes the show really pop.

There are still questions about whether “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” will move on at the end of the season. Yet Goor and Schur don’t seem to care, and instead carry on business as usual. The resulting strong start to the season should help launch the show back into the public eye. With a supremely talented cast that shares excellent chemistry, “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” continues to shine at every turn. Hopefully, the cancellation and Samberg’s recent Globes hosting duty will bring new viewers to the cult favorite.

What do you think of the new season of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine?” Does it live up to the hyped return? Let us hear your thoughts in the comments below!

GRADE: (½)

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