(AUGUST 19 – AUGUST 21, 2016 estimates)

  1. Suicide Squad (Week 3) – $20,710,000
  2. Sausage Party (Week 2) – $15,325,000
  3. War Dogs (Opening) – $14,300,000
  4. Kubo and the Two Strings (Opening) – $12,610,000
  5. Ben-Hur (Opening) – $11,350,000
  6. Pete’s Dragon (Week 2) – $11,331,000
  7. Bad Moms (Week 4) – $8,068,000
  8. Jason Bourne (Week 4) – $7,980,000
  9. The Secret Life of Pets (Week 7) – $5,770,000
  10. Florence Foster Jenkins (Week 2) – $4,300,000

———————————

  • Harley-Quinn-Will-Either-Make-Or-Break-Suicide-SquadDespite toxic reviews from both critics and audiences, the total for Suicide Squad continues to climb. The film spent its third consecutive weekend at the top of the box office. It’s 52% drop still isn’t a good sign of the film’s legs. It’s continued dominance speaks more to the paltry nature of its competitors. The film’s domestic total currently stands at $262 million, inching closer to the $300 million threshold. The film also saw its foreign total eclipse its domestic total, as it has now made $572 million worldwide. It’s hard to deny audiences’ curiosity in watching the DC world built out, but these high drop offs mean Warner Brothers will have to step up their game, quality wise, in order to keep people coming back.
  • Seth Rogen’s raunchy animated comedy Sausage Party continued to do strong business, but doesn’t seem to be the word of mouth comedy sensation it was poised to be. The film dropped a steep 55% in its second weekend. However, that is similar to Rogen’s Pineapple Express, which went on to gross $87 million. Currently, the film’s domestic total stands at a strong $65 million, especially compared to its $19 million production budget. There is still a shot for the movie to pass $100 million domestic, but it is looking thinner and thinner by the moment, unless it starts showing some word of mouth boosts in the next couple of weeks.
  • The top performing new film of the weekend was surprisingly the bro/arms dealer comedy War Dogs starring Miles Teller and Jonah Hill. However, against a $40 million production budget, that still is not quite a success for the film. As director Todd Phillips first film since the Hangover trilogy, this also represents the second lowest opening weekend for one of his films, besting only the Jon Heder bomb School for Scoundrels. The B Cinemascore shows audiences haven’t exactly given the film their blessing, so we shouldn’t expect long legs for this film.
  • The well reviewed Laika Animated film Kubo and the Two Strings hit a sour note on its opening weekend. The $60 million budgeted film saw the lowest opening weekend yet for the Laika studio, who had also done Coraline, ParaNorman, and The Boxtrolls. Positive reviews could help the film over the coming weeks, especially with less family competition. However, it doesn’t seem likely for the film to get near the $50 million total The Boxtrolls hit. A total around $40 million even seems a bit optimistic.
  • The summer blockbuster graveyard just got a bit more crowded. The $100 million remake of the 1959 best picture winner, Ben-Hur, tanked with just $11 million in its opening weekend. Not even a heavily targeted faith based marketing campaign could save the ill fated remake that was plagued with bad reviews and no marquee stars. Both the Ben-Hur brand name didn’t seem to register with a broad audience and those who loved the original film felt the remake was blasphemous. It seems wildly optimistic to even see the film scraping together $30 million total domestic. Overseas it was only able to muster $10.7 million for a worldwide total of $22 million. It still has quite a few markets to open in over the coming months. However, it is going to take a lot more bodies in seats to recoup the massive losses Paramount/MGM face with this production.
  • Family audiences continued to remain un-enamored with Disney’s latest offering, Pete’s Dragon. The film dropped 47% in its second weekend, bringing its domestic total to $42 million. Even with a $65 million budget, the movie seems to be struggling to make a profit. A foreign total of $14 million doesn’t help alleviate concerns. Though the film boasts some good reviews, it just doesn’t seem to compel families to go out to the theaters.
  • While Sausage Party isn’t quite the comedy sleeper hit people thought it might be, Bad Moms is more than happy to take up that title. The female led R-rated comedy once again had the smallest week by week drop of the top 10. Easing only 29%, the film brought its domestic total to $85 million, closing the gap between it and the illustrious $100 million mark. Adding in its $20 million in foreign dollars, the film’s worldwide total comes to a robust $106 million. That’s incredibly strong for the modestly budgeted $20 million film. While critics may be harping on the unprofitability of the female-led Ghostbusters as proof women can’t sell films, Mila Kunis and company are putting that notion to bed.
  • Matt Damon’s return to his iconic Jason Bourne role did an adequate job of maintaining its audience. The film lost 42% of its audience in its fourth weekend. This brings its domestic total to $140 million and worldwide total to $278 million. While this makes the $300 million worldwide benchmark more feasible, it still pales in comparison to the series’ high. Additionally, the film spent its first weekend behind Bad Moms, which opened the same weekend as Jason Bourne.
  • The animated hit Secret Life of Pets continued its amazing run for an original animated film. The film experienced a 36% drop in its stellar seventh weekend, bringing its domestic total to a staggering $346 million. This is especially stellar considering its $75 million budget. Since adding additional markets, the film has been able to jump start its foreign box office, which was lagging a bit. Currently, the worldwide total for the film stands at a huge $674 million. A final total of $750 – 800 million sounds within reach.
  • Older audiences continued to turn out for the Meryl Streep period piece Florence Foster Jenkins. The film dropped a small 34% in its second weekend. This is a bit larger than the 31% drop Ricki and The Flash experienced last year. However, it is lower than other Streep hits Julie & Julia and Hope Springs. Although, both of those movies had much larger opening weekends. It’s domestic total stands at $14.4 million, while its worldwide total is at $24.1 million. If the film continues in the same manner as Ricki and the Flash, it should wind up with around $25 million, possibly more if the Oscar conversations around Streep and co-star Hugh Grant heat up.

———————————

  • hell-or-high-water-trailerThe drama Hell or High Water, starring Chris Pine and Jeff Bridges, had a strong week of expansion. The film added a robust 440 theaters, for a total of 472 theaters, to capitalize on the strong reviews. Capitalize it did. The film grossed $2.6 million for the weekend, bringing the film’s two week total to $3.5 million. Its per theater average stood at a strong $5,614, which was larger than any per theater average in the top 10, including Suicide Squad. The film seems ready and primed for a more wide expansion in the coming weeks leading up to Labor Day weekend.
  • The latest round of expansion didn’t fare nearly as well for Don’t Think Twice. The stand up comedy added 30 theaters, bringing its total to 100 theaters. However, it only saw a 9% growth in box office, grossing $400K. The film’s per theater average stood at $4,002. That’s not bad for the film, but as it expands ever so slowly, it seems to be losing traction and conversation with the general public. Perhaps the chance to make a play for going wide has come and gone, especially with Hell or High Water gaining so much momentum.
  • Video game fans didn’t turn out in droves for Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy: XV. The animated film based on the popular video game had a very limited opening weekend, playing in only 24 theaters. However, fans didn’t pack those theaters, as it only grossed $114K in its opening weekend. This amounts to a per theater average of $4,750, which squashes the film’s hope of expansion.