(AUGUST 12 – AUGUST 14, 2016 estimates)

  1. Suicide Squad (Week 2) – $43,770,000
  2. Sausage Party (Opening) – $33,600,000
  3. Pete’s Dragon (Opening) – $21,501,000
  4. Jason Bourne (Week 3) – $13,620,000
  5. Bad Moms (Week 3) – $11,450,000
  6. The Secret Life of Pets (Week 6) – $8,840,000
  7. Star Trek Beyond (Week 4) – $6,800,000
  8. Florence Foster Jenkins (Opening) – $6,580,000
  9. Nine Lives (Week 2) – $3,500,000
  10. Lights Out (Week 4) – $3,220,000

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  • Harley-Quinn-Will-Either-Make-Or-Break-Suicide-SquadSometimes being top of the box office can still feel like a consolation prize. Suicide Squad managed to stay atop the weekend box office for a second week in a row. This came at a price, however, as the poorly reviewed DC film hemorrhaged 67% of its opening weekend. That drop is only slightly better than the 69% drop of Batman vs. Superman, but shows the film will have no box office legs as the summer winds down. Still, it’s domestic total stands at $222 million. Yet, $300 million domestic, at this rate, seems a bit out of reach. Still, the film has shown some resilience overseas, culminating in a foreign total of $465 million. The film will easily pass $500 million, but $600 million seems like a tougher bar to clear.
  • The true winner of the weekend was Seth Rogen’s R-rated animated film Sausage Party. The raunchy film, which takes a Pixar-esque look at the inner lives of food at a supermarket, nearly doubled tracking predictions to earn $33 million for the weekend. This was also against a $19 million budget, making the film a hugely profitable late summer hit. Three years ago, Seth Rogen took a similar risky concept with This is the End and that film had such strong legs it quintupled its opening weekend to cross the $100 million threshold. While Sausage Party might not be able to do that well, a final gross between $110 – 120 million doesn’t seem hard at all if it holds well enough. In fact, this gross was right in line with another August raunchy hit, Superbad.
  • Disney remade another one of the classics from their vault, to mixed returns. Pete’s Dragon grossed an ok $21 million. With strong reviews and a dearth of family content, the film should pick up steam in the next couple of weeks. Coupled with the modest production budget of $65 million, the film should break even. However, it is not enough to be the runaway hit of the late summer box office. A final total of around $70 million seems doable for the film.
  • Jason Bourne was able to save some face in its third weekend. The film dropped 39% to bring its domestic total to $126 million and its global total to $246 million. This puts the film officially ahead of both the original Bourne Identity and the misguided Jeremy Renner chapter The Bourne Legacy. Still, it is quite a ways away from matching either The Bourne Supremacy or The Bourne Ultimatum. A final gross of $150 million domestic seems doable, as does a crack at $300 million worldwide. That final tally is nothing to scoff at, but shows that Bourne has shown his age a bit.
  • The best hold of the weekend went to STX Entertainment’s comedy sleeper hit, Bad Moms. The Mila Kunis comedy dropped a minuscule 18% for an $11 million third weekend gross. It’s an incredible hold showing the comedy’s long shelf life and durability. This brought the film’s domestic gross to $71 million and gives it a fighting chance at crossing the $100 million mark. That’s not bad at all considering the film’s $20 million price tag.
  • Close behind it in terms of scant week over week drops was the animated juggernaut The Secret Life of Pets. The film dropped 23% in its remarkable sixth weekend in theaters. This brings its domestic total to $335 million and its worldwide total to $592 million. It seems the film has started to expand into further foreign markets and is showing some robust strength. If it keeps this up, a worldwide total closer to $750 million doesn’t seem out of reach at all.
  • Star Trek Beyond saw a glimmer of hope in its fourth weekend in theaters. The film had the lowest drop of its box office life, losing only 32% of its business. This added another $6.8 million to its domestic total of $139 million, still a far cry from the $200 million plus domestic runs of the previous films in the rebooted franchise. A domestic gross of $150 million seems about right. Overseas, the film continued to fall behind its predecessors. It’s $211 worldwide gross is a far cry from the $385 and $467 million worldwide grosses of the previous films. With a $185 million price tag, that has to sting a little.
  • Meryl Streep seems to have shifted her late summer box office mojo. The three time Academy Award winning actress used to open smash hits, such as Julie & Julia, The Devil Wears Prada and Mamma Mia! late in the summer to huge numbers. Even Hope Springs had solid box office. The opening of Florence Foster Jenkins mirrored the opening of last year’s Ricki and the Flash. That film didn’t open strong, but had a good enough multiplier to wind up with a final total of $26 million. Florence Foster Jenkins has stronger reviews and Oscar buzz, which may carry it a bit closer to $30 million. It’s a lob of a box office performance, but it was modestly budgeted and opened in roughly 1,500 theaters, so this is solid enough performance for it.
  • The much maligned family comedy Nine Lives didn’t show signs of much future life at the box office. The film dropped 44% in its second weekend. While facing the opening of Pete’s Dragon might not have helped, it’s a solid enough drop for concern for a family film. The film’s total stands at a pitiful $13 million and should vanish from the top 10 within a week or so.
  • The horror film Lights Out has likely reached the end of its run in the top 10, but not without a solid box office performance to show for it. The horror film dropped 46% this week to bring its total to $61 million. That’s an astounding total for a film that cost a mere $4.9 million to make.

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  • thumbnail_24585The war drama Anthropoid failed to get enough people fired up to go to the theaters this weekend. The film opened in 452 theaters, but only mustered up $1.2 million. That’s a less than stellar per theater average of $2,684 for the film’s opening weekend. The problem with a limited film opening in so many theaters is there is no room for it to grow now that it has sunk in its first frame.
  • The drama Indignation continued to have a strong expansion, jumping 91% this weekend for a weekend total of $804K. This comes after the film added 212 theaters for a total of 267 theaters. Its per theater average was a solid, but unremarkable $3,014. However, it has cleared $1.5 million in domestic box office and could see some more returns with a less crowded limited release front over the next couple of weeks.
  • The well reviewed bank robbing thriller Hell or High Water, starring Star Trek’s Chris Pine, saw the strongest per theater average of the weekend. The film opened to $592K from 32 theaters for a good per theater average of $18,500. With star power behind the film, including Jeff Bridges, and good word of mouth, the film should continue to expand well.
  • In terms of expanding well, the improv comedy Don’t Think Twice stayed relatively stagnant (losing only 1.6% week over week) as it added another 13 theaters for a total of 70 theaters. The well reviewed comedy showed a per theater average of $5,250, which shows enough lifeblood for a major expansion to happen. The film’s gross stands at $1.2 million so far.